Review of Approaching the Unknown Film

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MY OPINION

“Nothing lives there.
Nothing has ever died there.
But I’m going to make it a reality.””

For those who think that a solo trip to Mars would be something adventurous or exciting, and who want to sign up for an upcoming expedition, I recommend “Approaching the Unknown” first. It looks like things aren’t exactly rosy after all. And don’t expect Star Wars or Star Trek situations. There is a high probability that loneliness and boredom have a psychological effect on your mental system. Most movie fans will sigh and shake their heads in intergalactic style, muttering that the release date is very unfavorable. Comparison with the “Martian” is inevitable. There is only one significant difference in the sequence of events. There was a problem with the departure from Mars at Mars. That’s where the big problem is getting there.

What I lacked was humor and an intense struggle for survival, like in “The Martian.“ And secondly, the exciting effect of “Gravity”. And these two films also made extensive use of impressive images and expensive special effects. This is probably due to the limited budget available for this independent science fiction. Of course, not everything has to be as spectacular and intense as in “The Martian”. But the complete absence of these elements also does not contribute to pleasure. To be honest, most of the time it’s boring and boring. We see Stanafort (Mark Strong) monotonously coping with his daily life. He’s doing his exercises. He sprays his plants. He is working on his revolutionary invention (which, looking back, turns out not to be so revolutionary), and in between, for some reason, he is learning Spanish. It’s not really the pleasure of the top shelf.

The highlight of this movie is the game of Mark Strong (which is in the title). A stoically calm scientist who sacrifices himself for this one-way trip. He made this enlightened decision as a service to humanity. So this is not a self-destruction mission for him. This is a great opportunity to take advantage of his invention. An energetic and enthusiastic start gradually turns into an atmosphere of despair. In the end, it sounded like an independent study of loneliness, routine, boredom and passion. The journey of survival in front of a letter with water is the main problem due to a miracle that does not work, and a miscalculation that makes the water supply impassable. Reasonably harmful. Especially if you need to cover several hundred thousand kilometers more.

Unlike “The Martian”, where everything looked quite realistic and plausible, there were questionable situations in this film. Why they launched another spaceship after the first one completely escaped me. Wouldn’t it be wiser if you waited until the first one landed safely? And the moment this second spacecraft deviates from its trajectory, they conclude that the gyroscope is to blame. This device looked so old-fashioned and primitive compared to the rest of this high-tech spaceship. I was just waiting for you to show me a weather station with a funny frog inside to make forecasts. Stanafort’s invention has also become a source of questions for me. Why did he have to check it out in the desert? To expand its boundaries? Was it a working prototype or not? Wouldn’t it be wise to pre-test it in a regular lab? I would have done that before I sent him on a billion dollar mission. And, apparently, some solutions are simple. Can’t you connect two cables? It’s nothing. Just take apart another place and put it between them. I believe that this cable was useless anyway and hung there just as an accessory.

Unlike “The Martian”, where everything looked quite realistic and plausible, there were questionable situations in this film. Why they launched another spaceship after the first one completely escaped me. Wouldn’t it be wiser if you waited until the first one landed safely? And the moment this second spacecraft deviates from its trajectory, they conclude that the gyroscope is to blame. This device looked so old-fashioned and primitive compared to the rest of this high-tech spaceship. I was just waiting for you to show me a weather station with a funny frog inside to make forecasts. Stanafort’s invention has also become a source of questions for me. Why did he have to check it out in the desert? To expand its boundaries? Was it a working prototype or not? Wouldn’t it be wise to pre-test it in a regular lab? I would have done that before I sent him on a billion dollar mission. And, apparently, some solutions are simple. Can’t you connect two cables? It’s nothing. Just take apart another place and put it between them. I believe that this cable was useless anyway and hung there just as an accessory.

In general, it was not a very creative film. He paints a realistic picture of life in isolation, as well as the will and discipline necessary to conduct such an expedition. Due to the lack of special effects (with the exception of some satellite images that looked like a lava lamp from the 70s and reminded me of “Fantastic Voyage“) and a small budget, a complex scenario was certainly required. Unfortunately, it wasn’t very difficult. The ultimate goal was to get to Mars. Even the charming duo at the gas station couldn’t stop it. I think the movie was like a trip to Mars: monotonous and routine. Even Mark Strong’s masterful game couldn’t solve this problem.

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